A Great Forgiveness

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This morning, while reading Matthew, I came across the following and my heart was struck in such a way to share. I have read this passage of Scripture many times, but as I thought through the great debt that we have been forgiven, I also thought about our tendency at times to hold grudges & to hold others to what we think they should be held to.

[The Parable of the Unforgiving Servant]
[21] Then Peter came up and said to him, “Lord, how often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?” [22] Jesus said to him, “I do not say to you seven times, but seventy-seven times.
[23] “Therefore the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his servants. [24] When he began to settle, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents. [25] And since he could not pay, his master ordered him to be sold, with his wife and children and all that he had, and payment to be made. [26] So the servant fell on his knees, imploring him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ [27] And out of pity for him, the master of that servant released him and forgave him the debt. [28] But when that same servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him a hundred denarii, and seizing him, he began to choke him, saying, ‘Pay what you owe.’ [29] So his fellow servant fell down and pleaded with him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you.’ [30] He refused and went and put him in prison until he should pay the debt. [31] When his fellow servants saw what had taken place, they were greatly distressed, and they went and reported to their master all that had taken place. [32] Then his master summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. [33] And should not you have had mercy on your fellow servant, as I had mercy on you?’ [34] And in anger his master delivered him to the jailers, until he should pay all his debt. [35] So also my heavenly Father will do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother from your heart.”
Matthew 18:21-35 ESV

talent was a monetary unit worth about twenty years’ wages for a laborer (10,000 talents were owed), & a denarius was a day’s wage for a laborer (100 denarii were owed).

So, looking at the difference between the 2 wages, it is very clear that one is a much greater debt. It almost seems impossible to pay it back.  It is an absolutely impossible debt to repay. The smaller amount was much more feasible, and compared to the larger, it is barely a drop in the bucket.

We are born with that same type of debt – one that is absolutely impossible to make amends for. Romans 6:23 tells us that the wages of sin is death. We are born sinful and death is the only thing we earn and deserve because God is Holy, perfect, & just. However, just like the servant in the passage above, God has shown mercy and has provided a way for our debt to be absolved and cancelled – His Son: Jesus Christ. When we place our faith and trust in Jesus for the forgiveness of our sins, we receive His righteousness. Our sin is taken out of our accounts and is replaced with righteousness (2 Cor. 5:21). Those that are in Christ are forgiven much, and because of this great truth, our lives should be marked by forgiveness.

The servant in the above story seems to have quickly forgotten how great of a debt he was forgiven. I think, as Christians, we do too. When someone ‘crosses’ us, offends us, or does us wrong, we are so quick to write them off and make them pay in our hearts & minds. Praise God that He has not done this to us! He showed great grace and mercy to us and we should do the same. By the power of the Holy Spirit, God has given us new hearts in Christ Jesus, hearts that are able to forgive with the same forgiveness we have received. May we always remember, and be grateful for, the forgiveness of our infinite debt from a Holy God and seek to honor and glorify Him in our forgiveness, mercy, and grace toward others.

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